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jellyplz
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Tue Feb 06, 2018 8:48 pm

Please describe in detail your daily tea habits and everything you know about British tea drinking.

I need to know, thank you!
Stonewick's Resident Leslie Knope

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TheRealLionCat
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Wed Feb 07, 2018 6:01 pm

Unfortunately British tea habits are unable to be shared with non-citizens of the Glorious Empire of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, ruled over justly by Her Majesty, Queen Elizabeth II.

This goes especially for those treasonous enough to willingly flee from the Glorious Light of the Empire, you traitorous American swine.

We wish you a lovely day.

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jellyplz
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Wed Feb 07, 2018 6:03 pm

*Glares at RLC and then shoots pistols in the air.*

FINE.
Stonewick's Resident Leslie Knope

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imkatan
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Wed Feb 07, 2018 6:05 pm

ISO 3103 is a standard published by the International Organization for Standardization (commonly referred to as ISO), specifying a standardized method for brewing tea, possibly sampled by the standardized methods described in ISO 1839. It was originally laid down in 1980 as BS 6008:1980 by the British Standards Institution. It was produced by ISO Technical Committee 34 (Food products), Sub-Committee 8 (Tea).

The abstract states the following:

The method consists in extracting of soluble substances in dried tea leaf, containing in a porcelain or earthenware pot, by means of freshly boiling water, pouring of the liquor into a white porcelain or earthenware bowl, examination of the organoleptic properties of the infused leaf, and of the liquor with or without milk, or both.

This standard is not meant to define the proper method for brewing tea, but rather how to document the tea brewing procedure so sensory comparisons can be made. An example of such a test would be a taste-test to establish which blend of teas to choose for a particular brand or basic label in order to maintain a consistent tasting brewed drink from harvest to harvest.

The work was the winner of the parodic Ig Nobel Prize for Literature in 1999.

To maintain consistent results, the following are recommendations given by the standard:

The pot should be white porcelain or glazed earthenware and have a partly serrated edge. It should have a lid that fits loosely inside the pot.
If a large pot is used, it should hold a maximum of 310 ml (±8 ml) and must weigh 200 g (±10 g).
If a small pot is used, it should hold a maximum of 150 ml (±4 ml) and must weigh 118 g (±10 g).
2 grams of tea (measured to ±2% accuracy) per 100 ml boiling water is placed into the pot.
Freshly boiling water is poured into the pot to within 4–6 mm of the brim. Allow 20 seconds for water to cool.
The water should be similar to the drinking water where the tea will be consumed
Brewing time is six minutes.
The brewed tea is then poured into a white porcelain or glazed earthenware bowl.
If a large bowl is used, it must have a capacity of 380 ml and weigh 200 g (±20 g)
If a small bowl is used, it must have a capacity of 200 ml and weigh 105 g (±20 g)
If the test involves milk, then it is added before pouring the infused tea unless that is contrary to the organisation's normal practice.
If milk is added after the pouring of tea, it is best added when the liquid is between 65 - 80 °C.
5 ml of milk for the large bowl, or 2.5 ml for the small bowl, is used.

The protocol has been criticized for omitting any mention of prewarming the pot. Ireland was the only country to object, and objected on technical grounds.

In 2003, the Royal Society of Chemistry published a press release entitled "How to make a Perfect Cup of Tea". This is as follows:

How to make a Perfect Cup of Tea

Ingredients: Loose-leaf Assam tea; soft water; fresh, chilled milk; white sugar.
Implements: Kettle; ceramic teapot; large ceramic mug; fine mesh tea strainer; tea spoon, microwave oven.
Draw fresh, soft water and place in kettle and boil. Boil just the required quantity to avoid wasting time, water and power.
While waiting for the water to boil place a ceramic tea pot containing a quarter of a cup of water in a microwave oven on full power for one minute.
Synchronise your actions so that you have drained the water from the microwaved pot at the same time that the kettle water boils.
Place one rounded teaspoon of tea per cup into the pot.
Take the pot to the kettle
as it is boiling, pour onto the leaves and stir.
Leave to brew for three minutes.
The ideal receptacle is a ceramic mug or your favourite personal mug.
Pour milk into the cup FIRST, followed by the tea, aiming to achieve a colour that is rich and attractive.
Add sugar to taste.
Drink at between 60-65 degrees Centigrade to avoid vulgar slurping which results from trying to drink tea at too high a temperature.

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Braderz
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Wed Feb 07, 2018 6:09 pm

Ah, Marvellous *sips tea*

Where do we start...

Rules... RULES - RULES OF TEA? yes... let me explain :glad:

RULE 1 - ADD MILK. THIS AIN'T NO COFFEE FAM
RULE 2 - DON'T LET IT GET COLD
RULE 3 - DON'T EVER REHEAT A COLD TEA
RULE 4 - ONLY USE A KETTLE TO BOIL THE WATER

ok :grin: Now we have got that out of the way - HERE ARE SOME FACTS!!

There are 3 brands of Tea that matter. No, seriously... only 3.

TETLEY
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YORKSHIRE
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PG TIPS
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/thread.

P.S Yorkshire is the best :tongue:
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RxFairy
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Wed Feb 07, 2018 7:07 pm

Can I just say how much I freaking LOVE imkatan's response. haha. I am dying.
Resident Drug Fairy and Stonewick DJ

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MemoryReborn
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Wed Feb 07, 2018 10:45 pm

As much as I speak in the queen's English (I blame my childhood friend for that), I think I do need to chip in a bit even as a non Brit.

But I need to get something out of the way.
Braderz wrote:
Wed Feb 07, 2018 6:09 pm
RULE 1 - ADD MILK. THIS AIN'T NO COFFEE FAM
HOW DARE YOU DEFILE TEA LIKE THIS. THOUSANDS OF YEARS OF EFFORT SPENT CULTIVATING THE PERFECT LEAF AND THE FIRST THING YOU DO IS ADD MILK TO IT?

-ahem-

I generally prefer a black tea during the mornings, breakfast teas are good. Otherwise, I tend to favor green teas, with my favorite being Genmaicha, green tea with roasted brown rice. Cheap, yes, but it's a wonderful simple taste that can be drunk all day. Good with meals, snacks, or on its own.

Really. Genmaicha is amazing.

I'm okay with Darjeeling. Jasmine I can...sorta tolerate, but it depends. Chai is generally a no unless it's an iced type. But no fruits, no spices, no sugars in my tea. Unless it's iced tea.

And the "sweet tea" they make in the Southern US, well, it tends to be a bit too sweet for me. Just a bit.

I'm not particularly picky with brewing; a hot water heater poured into a cup of tea works just fine, but a proper kettle is superior. I do have two tea sets, a porcelain and a stone set, but I vastly, and I mean vastly, prefer the stone set. It's the type with the wicker handle that arcs over the top of the pot.
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Thrillshire
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Thu Feb 08, 2018 12:39 am


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